Introduction to mindfulness: an eight-week, practice-based course.

27th of April from 10:00 to 11:30 am at

Amitabha Hospice
44 Powell St
Avondale
Auckland 1026

Mindfulness has been shown to have positive impact in people’s lives in many domains. In this course you will learn to tap into your own potential for greater ease and balance in response to life’s challenges.

This introductory course will be facilitated by Marlies Dorrestein, occupational therapist and mindfulness practitioner with support from Charles Lips, psychologist . Marlies will guide practice, reflection and discussion in a small group of carers in a safe and comfortable space at Amitabha Hospice in Avondale.

You will learn about some of the knowledge underpinning mindfulness practice; however, the focus of the course is on supporting you to bring mindfulness skills into your everyday life through a variety of mindfulness practices, and to explore the effects and meaning of this for you in your unique situation.

 

Marlies is a NZ registered occupational therapist, and occupational therapy lecturer at Auckland University of Technology. She brings a longstanding formal and informal mindfulness practice, training in teaching mindfulness and has completed her Master of Health Science research on what it is like to teach mindfully in tertiary education. She facilitates mindfulness courses in a variety of contexts: for healthcare assistants in dementia care, for academics and administrative staff in higher education, and this year for students in the occupational therapy programme.

She has learnt from several mindfulness teachers including James Carmody (University of Massachusetts Medical School), Stephen Archer (Mindfulness Training New Zealand), Sue Dykes and Diane May (Mindfulness Auckland), and Bob Stahl (University of Massachusetts Medical School) and Timothea Goddard (through the Mindfulness Training Institute – Australia and New Zealand during the first level MBSR teacher training)

Marlies’ interest in mindfulness stems from the benefits she has experienced when bringing mindfulness practice into her everyday life, from using it specifically in relation to her personal and spiritual development, her own health and wellbeing, and when using it while teaching at AUT, from her masters’ research and from the results described in the literature. She wants to hold a space for others to have access to the value of this practice within their personal and professional lives.